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Thursday, July 21, 2005

If Something Seems Somehow Familiar About FEC v Bloggers, That's Because It Is! Sceptic's Eye Takes Us Back to 1946

In fact, you might even do a Yogi and say it's deja vu all over again! Back in 1946 Congress tried to ban union newspapers published on behalf of political candidates. Allison Hayward of Scepticseye.com explains why that case is eerily like the current conflagration over the FEC's proposed rule regulating political speech on the Internet.